Cromey Online

The writings of author, therapist, and priest Robert Warren Cromey.

My Photo
Name:
Location: San Francisco, California, United States

Friday, July 22, 2016



How Does a Follower of Jesus Campaign?

I do not call myself a Christian much anymore. A follower of Jesus is what I prefer. Too many Christians are hateful, narrow, prejudiced cruel and exclusionary. My leader and inspiration is Jesus. He called on his followers to feed the hungry, heal the sick and visit those in prison. He calls us to love and forgive our neighbors, ourselves and our enemies. He spoke against injustice. I do my best to follow Jesus teachings. My life works best that way. Pope Francis said recently that churches the do not feed the poor should be taxed. I agree with that.

Many Christian friends belong to and support their churches and denominations, which discriminate against homosexuals, women and same sex marriages.

Many of my Christian friends mock, degrade, scorn and deride Donald Trump.  Yes, Jesus got angry and did some name-calling. He did not have a perfect moral life. He also did not participate in elections.

I don’t think mocking and degrading candidates help win elections. Campaign managers think some negative ads do help runs for office.

I choose to support, encourage, seek the truth and contribute to the Hilary Rodham Clinton. I do not like her negative campaigning as I am sure will happen.

I think her experience in government, as senator and Secretary of State and her common sense will make her a good President. She was also the wife of the President for eight years.

The government can only accomplish help for the poor, adequate health care, control of blatant and cruel capitalism. I will support policies that work toward those ends. I think the Democratic Party, with all its flaws, can best accomplish those ends.



Sunday, July 03, 2016

YES OR NO

How can a Serious Christian be and American?

The present American values are: Get rich, Buy stuff, Worship Celebrities. Put band-aids on social problems like homelessness, affordable housing, immigrants and health care.
Spend billions on defense.

Declaration of Independence was proclaimed in 1776. We celebrate it on July, 4. It separated the colonies from England. It freed us from unjust taxation, proclaimed free enterprise. However, the declaration exempted slaves, women and Native Americans.

John Adams, a prominent New England farmer and lawyer went to Philadelphia in 1776. Abigail, his wife said do something for the women. They did not.

Jesus says these words to his disciples and therefore to us. “Love your neighbors and your enemies.” This is radical Christianity. It is not how most people treat each other. Jesus words are standards by which we hold our values. He also says elsewhere to feed the hungry, heal the sick and stand against injustice.

How can a serious Christian be and American?

We rejoice and give thanks that we are an independent nation, no longer dominated by England or any other country.

We rejoice that we have a solid constitution and strong Bill of Rights.

We are thankful that most of us have the right to vote. Yet many states try to prevent people from voting.

We Christians are glad that the state may not interfere with the practice of our religion.

We give thanks for our freedom to speak and assemble. As a preacher I do not have to worry that the government can censor my remarks.

A serious Christian is a mature person, a thoughtful person and one who lives with ambiguity.

I can love my country and criticize the Congress for failing to protect the citizenry from random gun violence.

I can love my country and hate its war mongering in the Middle East.

I can love my country and hate the treatment of immigrant people.

I can love my country and decry that our capitalist system cause so many to be hungry, homeless and live in poverty.

I can love my country as a patriotic American and protest police killing young men and women of color. I can protest police murders and at the same time as giving thanks for the bravery of police officers who risk their lives to help other. That is what I mean by ambiguity.

A serious Christian is open to love our country and be its severest critics.

Jesus calls us to love our enemies as well as our neighbors. The U.S. government chooses to wage war instead of waging peace.

Jesus says love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you. Radical Christians can help mobilize and deepen and humanize American values.

A sermon by The Rev. Robert Warren Cromey, Church of St. John the Evangelist, San Francisco, July 3, 2016.

How can a Serious Christian be and American?

Jesus says these words to his disciples and therefore to us. “Love your neighbors and your enemies.” This is radical Christianity. It is not how most people treat each other. Jesus words are standards by which we hold our values. He also says elsewhere to feed the hungry, heal the sick and stand against injustice.

The present American values are: Get rich, Buy stuff, Worship Celebrities. Put band-aids on social problems like homelessness, affordable housing, immigrants and health care.
Spend billions on defense.

Declaration of Independence was proclaimed in 1776. We celebrate it on July, 4. It separated the colonies from England. It freed us from unjust taxation, proclaimed free enterprise. However, the declaration exempted slaves, women and Native Americans.

John Adams, a prominent New England farmer and lawyer went to Philadelphia in 1776. Abigail, his wife said do something for the women. They did not.

How can a serious Christian be and American?

We rejoice and give thanks that we are an independent nation, no longer dominated by England or any other country.

We rejoice that we have a solid constitution and strong Bill of Rights.

We are thankful that most of us have the right to vote. Yet many states try to prevent people from voting.

We Christians are glad that the state may not interfere with the practice of our religion.

We give thanks for our freedom to speak and assemble. As a preacher I do not have to worry that the government can censor my remarks.

A serious Christian is a mature person, a thoughtful person and one who lives with ambiguity.

I can love my country and criticize the Congress for failing to protect the citizenry from random gun violence.

I can love my country and hate its war mongering in the Middle East.

I can love my country and hate the treatment of immigrant people.

I can love my country and decry that our capitalist system cause so many to be hungry, homeless and live in poverty.

I can love my country as a patriotic American and protest police killing young men and women of color. I can protest police murders and at the same time as giving thanks for the bravery of police officers who risk their lives to help other. That is what I mean by ambiguity.

A serious Christian is open to love our country and be its severest critics.

Jesus calls us to love our enemies as well as our neighbors. The U.S. government chooses to wage war instead of waging peace.

Jesus says love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you. Radical Christians can help mobilize and deepen and humanize American values.

A sermon by The Rev. Robert Warren Cromey, Church of St. John the Evangelist, San Francisco, July 3, 2016.





Thursday, June 30, 2016

SF Chronicle, homeless and proffits

Thank you for the sad and moving series on the homeless. I live in the Mission. Dozens of homes are being built next door to men and women hanging out and sleeping on the streets. Few if any homeless persons will move into those apartments and condominiums. Profit making entities build these buildings. The companies and stockholders want their profits and dividends.

My question is how much profit is enough? If profits were reduced, perhaps units would be cheaper. If profits were reduced then true low cost housing could be built.  If profits were reduced some units could be built for the temporary homeless as they transition to better quarters.

Profits are good and necessary for buildings to be built. They do not have to be made at the expense of the poor and homeless.

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

CANNERY ROW

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

We enjoyed our stay at the Spindrift Hotel on Cannery Row in Monterey, CA. June 24-27. We went to escape the revelers for gay pride weekend where Dolores Park is crammed full of celebrants all weekend.

Our hotel was right in the midst of the tourist laden Cannery Row. John Steinbeck’s novel of the same name made the area famous. Now the end piece is the large Monterey bay Aquarium with a wonderful collection of fish, seals and coral. Speakers and guides make the visit interesting for most. We were there on Monday morning June 27 and the place was packed by noon. Getting there at opening time meant we did not feel too crowded. Whole and partial families walked through the exhibits. Children aplenty stared in wonder at the   30 feet high tanks of fish of all sizes and colors swimming idly around being gazed upon.  I had a feeling of sadness that the fish were in captivity, like the zoo animals.

I did notice that there were many people of color and ethnicity different from baseball games, the opera and symphony.

We walked for a half hour before we went into the aquarium, partly to keep warm on the chilly morning. After an hour in the Aquarium I got quite tired and even bored once we had made a good round the major exhibits. I went for coffee and a bun while Ann pursued her interest in other aspects of the institution.

Many people raved about the feeding of the seals to take place at 11 AM. We stood for 15 minutes to watch a couple of seals surface and chomp on bread and meal. As usual I thought it was highly over-rated. It takes a lot to excite me much less interest me mildly. Ann of course is interested and excited about all things in nature. She is so wonderful that way.

The hotel room 403 had a watery view of the Monterey Bay.  Blue water, sail boats, foggy mornings and sun in the late morning and afternoon. The room was colored in browns, tans and white trims. There was a fireplace, two easy chairs, a footrest in front and a large TV above the fireplace. We never turned on the set. Oh, yes a king sized bed.

I lit the gas-generated fire and had not opened the damper enough and we had a smoke filled room and a noisy alarm excite us. Shane, a bellhop came, opened the windows and shooed the smoke away from the alarm. After a few minutes the smoke diminished and things returned to a smelly smoke normal breathing air.

There is a print in the room with diametric forms that looked like a turkey to me. It was done in browns, dark reds and whites. It was pleasing and provocative to look at, as one could never be sure exactly what it depicted.

Each morning we had a continental breakfast served in the room. It features hard boiled eggs, raisin brain, orange juice a fruit plate with pineapple, melon and berries, coffee, cream milk and some delicious brown moist muffins.

After breakfast we took a walk up and own the three blocks of Cannery Row and we walked a ways together and Ann went on to hike a longer distance.

We were delighted surprised how good the food was right along this touristy walk. In Lalla salads with seafood, at Linguini Louis we had delicious fettuccini with fresh clams in a wine and lemon sauce.  The first night we ate in The Sardine Factory, an old style, very expensive Italian place that is a veteran on the area. I had abalone with way too much creamy sauce all over it. Ann had scallops, which she liked. They pride themselves as having resisted California Cuisine and it showed. Our final dinner was in a take out restaurant with tables. We sat down and had quite good chicken, spinach and cheese dis Panak Paneer.


I loved it that we could walk right out of our hotel into a busy people strewn street with shops and restaurants nearby.

Monday, June 20, 2016

PRAYERS OF THE PEOPLE

What to Do at the Prayers of the People

Here is a time in the service when you can make your particular concerns aloud or silently. Think of the events in the news that affect you –war, politics or upheavals in the world. We pray for our leaders in church and state, in our city and government. We remember the issues affecting our water, air and health.

We pray for the sick in mind body or spirit; those with addictions and chronic diseases; those displaced by war, famine, earthquake, fire and food.

We remember those who have asked for our prayers. We remember them by saying their names aloud as printed in the prayer list.

We pray for those who have died recently and in the past. Remembering by mentioning their names aloud or silently makes the memory real.

Perhaps each Sunday before we come too church we take a moment to make a note on paper or mentally of the people, issues and concerns that we want to mention during the prayers of the people. This helps us connect the important things in our lives to the prayers.

Remember that when we pray for things, we may be called to do something about what we pray for. If we pray for peace, we work for peace. If we pray for someone who is sick, we might visit them, send food, a card, flowers, make a phone call or send an email.


RWC

Thursday, June 16, 2016

HILARY NOT DONALD

Donald Trump is the presumptive candidate for the Republican nomination for President of the United States. Hilary Rodham Clinton will probably be his democratic opponent. Trump’s campaign features anti Muslim and anti Mexican rhetoric. He proposes laws preventing Muslims from entering the U.S. He also wants a wall to be built to keep out illegal immigrants from Mexico. He appeals to the American underclass. They are Americans who are poorly paid, feel excluded from the mainstream and feel foreigners have taken over the job market.


The campaign will be viscous as Trump is charismatic, foul mouthed and unrestrained.  Clinton will answer his allegations with damning advertisements designed to further denigrate her opponent. I will vote for and support Hilary Rodham Clinton.