Cromey Online

The writings of author, therapist, and priest Robert Warren Cromey.

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Location: San Francisco, California, United States

Wednesday, January 21, 2009

What Was Missing on Inauguration Day?

We heard:
We are all one nation.
Yellow gets mellow
White does right
Brown gets around
Where was the other, say?
Lesbian and Gay?


I wrote this little ditty to point out how homophobia crept into the inaugural process. The marginalizing of LGBT people at the inauguration plus the passing of Proposition 8 in California make it all the more clear how perverse and evil anti-gay sentiments are in our country.

A notorious homophobe gave the opening prayer.
Openly gay Episcopal Bishop Gene Robinson was invited to give a prayer at the pre- inauguration concert. The prayer was scheduled to be presented before the Obamas were seated. Then the microphones failed and the TV cameras did not record the Bishop's prayer.

Obama blamed his staff for the error and invited Bishop Robinson to sit in the reviewing stand at the post inauguration parade. I never saw him pictured in that reviewing stand during the parade.

Obama and the clergy giving prayers mentioned by name many minority groups and omitted any reference to gays or lesbians.

CNN turned their cameras to the viewing stand when the Gay Freedom Day band marched by. The cameras returned to the bands after the gay band had marched by.

The news media and the Obama program have LGBT rights quite low on their priorities. Homosexuals and their supporters need to continue to work all the harder to achieve full rights as American citizens and be included in all walks of life.

Friday, January 09, 2009

Israeli Juggernaut Assails the Poor

To the Editor o the S.F. Chronicle:

The U.S. Senate passed a resolution by voice vote supporting the Israeli government’s bombing and invasion of Gaza. Again the U.S. government condones these attacks by the most powerful military force in the middle – east on the poorest, walled off, poverty stricken, poorly educated, home wrecked people in the region. Neither the Israelis, the U.S. nor anyone has addressed the miserable and oppressive living conditions of the people of Gaza. Until the basic inhumane infrastructure is repaired and improved violence, sadly, will result.

Tuesday, January 06, 2009

Gaza, Jews and Anti-Semitism

Letter to a Jewish Friend

I suspect neither of us will change our views of what happens in the Israel/Palestinian situation. Reason seldom wins over passionate conviction.
As with most of my Jewish friends, we are willing to let friendship conquer our desire to be right. We leave that rancorous social-political issue best left un-discussed.

Support the Poor and Disenfranchised

I will always support the poor and the disenfranchised, the weak and the powerless. The U.S. backed Israeli government oppresses the Palestinian people and has done for fifty years. Little or nothing has been done to change the poverty and miserable living conditions of the Palestinian people. Nothing has been done to change the infrastructure of Israel to relive the poverty and powerlessness of the Palestinian people.

Non-Violence

I also do not believe violence does anything more than create violence.

The Israelis and Palestinians continue to kill each other. Americans tend to support one side or the other. Each side sees the other side as good or evil depending on their point of view. Neither side admits they are wrong. Each side demonizes the other. Self-righteousness abounds on both sides.

Most Israelis, Palestinians and Americans approve of violence as appropriate response to grievances.

Those of us active in the non-violent peace movement call for negotiations between warring parties as necessary steps toward bringing an end to the hostilities in Gaza. Labeling either side as terrorist dehumanizes them. Statements that say we do not negotiate with so-called terrorists keep parties from the negotiating table.

As a follower of Jesus the Revolutionary, I want to follow the path of forgiveness, reconciliation and peace. “My peace I leave with you.”

Anti-Semitism, Conscience and Speaking Out

Many fear being called an anti-Semite if we criticize Israel. I have been called that. Only I can judge whether I am an anti Semite or not. I must gather in and monitor my conscience. Anyone else’s statement that I am an anti-Semite remains in the world of pious opinion and nothing else. I alone know if I am one who loves or hates Jews. I am clear that I am not an anti-Semite because I disagree with Israeli policies.

I also believe that powerful and wealthy American Jews have forced our legislators into silence or compliance on Israeli policies about the Palestinians. This includes the Clintons, the Bushes and Barak Obama. They have threatened to defeat politicians who are not supportive of Israel and have done so. This statement also is regarded by some as anti-Semitic. We on the liberal left and in the peace movement must not be deterred by threats of being labeled an anti-Semite. We can trust our consciences.

Monday, January 05, 2009

Negotiate in Gaza

The Israelis and Palestinians continue to kill each other. Americans tend to support one side or the other. Each side sees the other side as good or evil depending on their point of view. Neither side admits they are wrong. Each side demonizes the other. Self-righteousness abounds on both sides.

Most Israelis, Palestinians and Americans approve of violence as appropriate responses to grievances.

Those of us active in the non-violent peace movement call for negotiations between warring parties as necessary steps toward bringing an end to the hostilities in Gaza. Very few opinion pieces or letters to the editor call for negotiations in the search for peace. It seems easier to take sides than find ways to peace.

Thursday, January 01, 2009

Negotiate Not Murder

Refusing to negotiate with so-called terrorist organizations prevents negotiations between warring factions. Powerful American Jewish lobbies prevent politicians, for fear of losing money and votes, from open discussion of Israeli policies. Some Palestinian leaders negotiate in bad faith. Those who interfere with real dialogue and negotiations for peace, approve of war and condone the continuing killing of Jews and Palestinians. The way to peace is not killing, but negotiations.